INTERMEDIATE - GRAMMAR

MODALS - MAY & MIGHT

We use may and might to talk about possible actions.
They have the same meaning and the grammar is the same.
We use might more often than we use may, but both are possible.

Look at these pairs of sentences. There is no difference in meaning.
We may go to Paris next year.
We might go to Paris next year.

We may not visit Berlin on our holiday.
We might not visit Berlin on our holiday.

I may not go out for dinner tonight. I'm not feeling very well.
I might not go out for dinner tonight. I'm not feeling very well.

PERFECT TENSES
We use may and might with perfect tenses in the past.

Look at these sentences.
We may have been on holiday when you rang.
She might have been sick last Monday.
They might not have known.

CONTINUOUS TENSES
We can use may be and might be with continuous tenses in the future.

I might be playing football on the weekend.
I may be going to Beijing next month.

Look at these sentences and put in the missing words (might / may / might have/ may have/ might be / may be).
Example:
Has anyone bought a new car recently?

I think Alex bought one. OR
I think Alex bought one.

1. Will you come out for dinner tonight?
I come.

2. Is Paul coming?
He not.

3. Will it rain tomorrow?
It .

4. How did the rumour start?
It started in a gossip magazine.

5. Where's Sue?
She be at work.

6. Will you come to theatre with us tomorrow night?
I come.

7. Where was Paul this afternoon?
I think he gone to the dentist.

8. What is Sally doing on the weekend?
I think she playing netball.

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